Established in 2020 Friday, January 22, 2021


Single-dose COVID-19 vaccine triggers antibody response in mice
A newly developed single-dose COVID-19 vaccine can trigger antibody responses in mice. Image: Hakan Nural, Unsplash.



WASHINGTON, DC.- Across the world, health care workers and high-risk groups are beginning to receive COVID-19 vaccines, offering hope for a return to normalcy amidst the pandemic. However, the vaccines authorized for emergency use in the U.S. require two doses to be effective, which can create problems with logistics and compliance. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Central Science have developed a nanoparticle vaccine that elicits a virus-neutralizing antibody response in mice after only a single dose.




The primary target for COVID-19 vaccines is the spike protein, which is necessary for SARS-CoV-2’s entry into cells. Both of the vaccines currently authorized in the U.S. are mRNA vaccines that cause human cells to temporarily produce the spike protein, triggering an immune response and antibody production. Peter Kim and colleagues wanted to try a different approach: a vaccine consisting of multiple copies of the spike protein displayed on ferritin nanoparticles. Ferritin is an iron storage protein found in many organisms that self-assembles into a larger nanoparticle. Other proteins, such as viral antigens, can be fused to ferritin so that each nanoparticle displays several copies of the protein, which might cause a stronger immune response than a single copy.

The researchers spliced spike protein and ferritin DNA together and then expressed the hybrid protein in cultured mammalian cells. The ferritin self-assembled into nanoparticles, each bearing eight copies of the spike protein trimer. The team purified the spike/ferritin particles and injected them into mice. After a single immunization, mice produced neutralizing antibody titers that were at least two times higher than those in convalescent plasma from COVID-19 patients, and significantly higher than those in mice immunized with the spike protein alone. A second immunization 21 days later produced even higher antibody levels. Although these results must be confirmed in human clinical trials, they suggest that the spike/ferritin nanoparticles may be a viable strategy for single-dose vaccination against COVID-19, the researchers say.

The authors acknowledge funding from the Stanford Maternal & Child Health Research Institute, the Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation, the National Institutes of Health, the Chan Zuckerberg Biohub, the Virginia and D. K. Ludwig Fund for Cancer Research and the Frank Quattrone and Denise Foderaro Family Research Fund.







Today's News

January 14, 2021

Remote sensing data sheds light on when and how asteroid Ryugu lost its water

Single-dose COVID-19 vaccine triggers antibody response in mice

Stanford researchers combine processors and memory on multiple hybrid chips to run AI on battery-powered smart devices

New virus mutation raises vaccine questions

'Game of Thrones' dire wolves far apart from other canines: study

British virus variant now in 50 countries: WHO

Mini robot fish swim in schools, just like the real thing

'Say ahh': Chinese robots take throat swabs to fight Covid outbreak

Superheroes, foods and apps bring a modern twist to the periodic table

Anti-microbial poles for public transport to be made in light of Covid-19 pandemic

The three days pregnancy sickness is most likely to start pinpointed

Mechanophores: Making polymer crystallization processes crystal clear

How will we achieve carbon-neutral flight in future?

How to keep drones flying when a motor fails

EPFL student creates a new language-analysis program

Climate change has caused billions of dollars in flood damages, according to Stanford researchers

Compound from medicinal herb kills brain-eating amoebae in lab studies

Spilling the beans on coffee's true identity



 


Editor & Publisher: Jose Villarreal
Art Director: Juan José Sepúlveda Ramírez



Tell a Friend
Dear User, please complete the form below in order to recommend the ResearchNews newsletter to someone you know.
Please complete all fields marked *.
Sending Mail
Sending Successful