Established in 2020 Sunday, December 5, 2021


Vaccines prevent severe Covid, even from Delta: study
In this file photo taken on August 19, 2021 (FILES) In this file photo a nurse fills a syringe with Johnson & Johnson's Janssen Covid-19 vaccine at a clinic on August 19, 2021 at Tournament House in Pasadena, California. Robyn Beck / AFP.



PARIS (AFP).- Vaccination is highly effective at preventing severe cases of Covid-19, even against the Delta variant, a vast study in France has shown.

The research published Monday -- focusing on prevention of severe Covid and death, not infection -- looked at 22 million people over 50 and found those who had received jabs were 90 percent less likely to be hospitalised or die.

The results confirm observations from the US, the UK and Israel, but researchers say it is the largest study of its kind so far.

Looking at data collected starting in December 2020, when France launched its jab campaign, the researchers compared the outcomes of 11 million vaccinated people with 11 million unvaccinated subjects.

They formed pairs matching an unvaccinated individual with a vaccinated counterpart from the same region and of the same age and sex, tracking them from the date of the vaccinated person's second jab to July 20.

Starting 14 days after a second dose, a vaccinated subjects' risk of severe Covid was reduced by 90 percent, according to the research conducted by Epi-Phare, an independent medicines safety research group that works closes with the French government.

Vaccination appears to be nearly as effective against for the Delta variant, with 84 percent protection for people 75 and older and 92 percent for people 50-75.

That estimate, however, is only based on a month of data, since the variant became dominant in France only in June.

"The study should be followed up to include results from August and September," epidemiologist Mahmoud Zureik, the head of Epi-Phare, told AFP.

The study covers vaccination with the Pfizer/BioNtech, Moderna and AstraZeneca jabs, but not Jannsen which was authorised much later and is far less widely used in France.

The results also suggest that over the period of study -- up to five months -- vaccination protection against severe Covid did not diminish.

© Agence France-Presse







Today's News

October 12, 2021

Nature of unknown gamma-ray sources revealed

Life on Mars: simulating Red Planet base in Israeli desert

Oldest footprints of pre-humans identified in Crete

Ocean life helps produce clouds, but existing clouds keep new ones at bay

Plant proteins to 'meat' changing consumer demands

New species of mollusk discovered by museum curator

Tree-dwelling mammals endured after asteroid strike destroyed forests

Vaccines prevent severe Covid, even from Delta: study

Radio signals from distant stars suggest hidden planets

The complex dynamics of stem cell tethers and slings

The new-new kids on the block: hybrid lizards

How to better identify dangerous volcanoes

A cryptography game-changer for biomedical research at scale

Building out of concrete, but without pouring concrete

Detecting retinal diseases with advanced AI technology

New images lead to better prediction of shear thickening

Corrosion can improve materials' durability

Climate change may already impact majority of humanity: study



 


Editor & Publisher: Jose Villarreal
Art Director: Juan José Sepúlveda Ramírez



Tell a Friend
Dear User, please complete the form below in order to recommend the ResearchNews newsletter to someone you know.
Please complete all fields marked *.
Sending Mail
Sending Successful