Established in 2020 Wednesday, May 31, 2023


Telecom-wavelength quantum repeater node transmits quantum information over tens of kilometers
Image courtesy: Uni Innsbruck/Harald Ritsch.



INNSBRUCK.- A quarter century ago, theoretical physicists at the University of Innsbruck made the first proposal on how to transmit quantum information via quantum repeaters over long distances, which would open the door to the construction of a worldwide quantum information network.

Now, a new generation of Innsbruck researchers has built a quantum repeater node for the standard wavelength of telecommunication networks and transmitted quantum information over tens of kilometers. The study is published in the journal Physical Review Letters.

Quantum networks connect quantum processors or quantum sensors with each other. This allows tap-proof communication and high-performance distributed sensor networks. Between network nodes, quantum information is exchanged by photons that travel through optical waveguides. Over long distances, however, the likelihood of photons being lost increases dramatically.

As quantum information cannot simply be copied and amplified, 25 years ago Hans Briegel, Wolfgang Dr, Ignacio Cirac and Peter Zoller, then all at the University of Innsbruck, provided the blueprints for a quantum repeater. These featured light-matter entanglement sources and memories to create entanglement in independent network links that are connected between them by a so-called entanglement swap to finally distribute entanglement over long distances.

Even transmission over 800 kilometers possible

Quantum physicists led by Ben Lanyon from the Department of Experimental Physics at the University of Innsbruck have now succeeded in building the core parts of a quantum repeater—a fully functioning network node made with two single matter systems enabling entanglement creation with a photon at the standard frequency of the telecommunications network and entanglement swapping operations.

The repeater node consists of two calcium ions captured in an ion trap within an optical resonator as well as single photon conversion to the telecom wavelength. The scientists thus demonstrated the transfer of quantum information over a 50-kilometer-long optical fiber, with the quantum repeater placed exactly halfway between starting and end point.

The researchers were also able to calculate which improvements of this design would be necessary to make transmission over 800 kilometers possible, which would allow them to connect Innsbruck to Vienna.







Today's News

May 25, 2023

Did dome-headed dinosaurs sport bristly headgear?

Scientists provide first field observations of coccolithophore carbon extraction

Leishmania parasite manipulates organism's defense system to continue replicating, study shows

Transcatheter mitral valve repair safe and effective, study finds

UC San Diego first to test cancer drugs in space using private astronaut mission

Telecom-wavelength quantum repeater node transmits quantum information over tens of kilometers

White-bellied pangolins have second-most chromosomes among mammals

Recently discovered protein domain regulates collagen transport

Element creation in the lab deepens understanding of surface explosions on neutron stars

Study points out errors in illustrations of one of the most famous scientific experiments

'Second-guessing' is a hard-wired behavior, study suggests

Machine learning approach opens insights into an entire class of materials being pursued for solid-state batteries

Prescribed burns encourage foul-smelling invaders

Lakes reflect the pace of shifting seasons, shows study

Researchers build bee robot that can twist



 


Editor & Publisher: Jose Villarreal
Art Director: Juan José Sepúlveda Ramírez



Tell a Friend
Dear User, please complete the form below in order to recommend the ResearchNews newsletter to someone you know.
Please complete all fields marked *.
Sending Mail
Sending Successful